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Rose Hill Plantation

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HOURS

Park grounds are open daily from 9 a.m. - 6 p.m. House museum tours are held: Mar.-Oct., daily at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. and Nov.-Feb. Thursday through Monday at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. The house is only accessible by guided tour. Tour times are subject to change; please call the park for further information.

OFFICE

Daily, 4 - 5 p.m.

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ADMISSION

Grounds are free. House tours: $5 age 16+, $3 SC Senior, $4 age 6-15, children under 5 are free. Groups of 15 or more, please contact park to make reservation for house tour.

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PETS

Pets are allowed in most outdoor areas provided they are kept under physical restraint or on a leash not longer than six feet.

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BY THE NUMBERS

1 historic mansion – home of “Secession Governor” William Henry Gist family during the 1800s

1858 the year William Henry Gist became Governor of South Carolina

100 varieties of heirloom roses are thought to have been found at the aptly named Rose Hill

4 magnolia trees in the gardens at the front of the mansion and are thought to be nearly 200 years old

2.5 miles of hiking trails

1960 the year when the South Carolina State Park Service acquired the property

3 house tours daily Thursday- Monday at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m.  Tour times are subject to change.

44 acres – although currently only 44 acres, the plantation once totaled nearly 2000 acres in the 1800s

1 visit that you’ll never forget!

Rose Hill Plantation State Historic Site

Midlands

Frequently Asked Questions

How large is Rose Hill plantation?

Estimates put the size of Rose Hill in the 1860’s between 7,000 to 8,000 acres.

Does the park service own the entire plantation?

No, the park is only the 44 acres immediately surrounding the Gist mansion.  However, the remaining acreage is part of the Sumter National Forest and as such is also protected for future generations

What was grown on the plantation?

Cotton and corn were the two primary products.  By 1860 Rose Hill was producing nearly 300 bales of cotton and 4,000 bushels of corn per year.  Early in the site’s history, oats also appear to have been a significant crop.

How did William Gist move his cotton to market this far inland?

It is assumed he shipped the cotton via the Tyger and Broad Rivers.  However, the Tyger is only navigable at certain times of the year.  It may have been necessary to transport the cotton overland via wagon to the Broad River.

Does Rose Hill have “slave quarters” on the site?

The location of the “slave quarters” remains unknown although the park service continues researching the topic.  What we do know is that in 1860 there were 17 structures at Rose Hill for housing approximately 178 enslaved individuals.

May I rent the grounds of Rose Hill for my wedding?

The grounds at Rose Hill Plantation may be rented for weddings and other events.  Please review our regulations for rental of the grounds for pricing and other information.

What are your metal detection guidelines for State Parks and State Park properties?

Click here for a printable version of our guidelines concerning metal detector use on state parks and state park properties.

Where is the park’s Ultimate Outsider stamp located?

Our Ultimate Outsider stamp is located at the park kiosk near the parking area.

For more general, statewide frequently asked questions, please click here.